China’s official manufacturing PMI for July fell from June and contracted again. Still.

The official PMIs come from the Chinese National Bureau of Statistics and the China Federation of Logistics and Purchasing.

For July:

Manufacturing 49.0, its lowest in 3 months and again in contraction

  • expected 50.3 and prior 50.2
  • China’s NBS attributes the result, according to statements reported in state media (Xinhua), to the traditional slack period in production, insufficient market demand and weakened performance of energy-intensive industries.

Non-manufacturing 53.8

  • expected 53.9, before 54.7

The “composite” of the two came in at 52.5, down from 54.1 in June.

It is not the first time recently that we have heard of “insufficient demand” as the reason for the poor performance of the country’s economic indicators. Ongoing epidemics and associated restrictions have played and continue to play a role in this regard.

On a more positive note, the non-manufacturing PMI indicator (this shows the performance of the services and construction sectors), although down from June, recorded a solid expansion.

At the margin, these numbers are a negative contribution to China’s proxy trades such as the AUD.

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Inflation

Inflation is defined as a quantitative measure of the rate at which the average price level of goods and services in an economy or country increases over a period of time. It is the rise in the general price level where a given currency is effectively buying less than it has in previous periods. In terms of valuation of strength or currencies, and by extension foreign currencies, inflation or its measures are extremely influential. Inflation stems from the global creation of money. This money is measured by the level of the total money supply of a specific currency, for example the US dollar, which is constantly increasing. However, an increase in the money supply does not necessarily mean that there is inflation. What leads to inflation is a faster increase in the money supply relative to the wealth produced (measured with GDP). This thus generates demand pressure on a supply that is not increasing at the same rate. The consumer price index then increases, generating inflation. How Does Inflation Affect Forex? The level of inflation has a direct impact on the exchange rate between two currencies on several levels. This includes purchasing power parity, which attempts to compare the different purchasing power of each country according to the general level of prices. By doing so, it helps to determine the country with the most expensive cost of living. The currency with the higher inflation rate consequently loses value and depreciates, while the currency with the lower inflation rate appreciates in the forex market. Interest rates are also impacted. Inflation rates that are too high push interest rates up, which has the effect of depreciating the currency on the exchange. Conversely, too low inflation (or deflation) pushes interest rates down, which has the effect of appreciating the currency on the foreign exchange market.

Inflation is defined as a quantitative measure of the rate at which the average price level of goods and services in an economy or country increases over a period of time. It is the rise in the general price level where a given currency is effectively buying less than it has in previous periods. In terms of valuation of strength or currencies, and by extension foreign currencies, inflation or its measures are extremely influential. Inflation stems from the global creation of money. This money is measured by the level of the total money supply of a specific currency, for example the US dollar, which is constantly increasing. However, an increase in the money supply does not necessarily mean that there is inflation. What leads to inflation is a faster increase in the money supply relative to the wealth produced (measured with GDP). This thus generates demand pressure on a supply that is not increasing at the same rate. The consumer price index then increases, generating inflation. How Does Inflation Affect Forex? The level of inflation has a direct impact on the exchange rate between two currencies on several levels. This includes purchasing power parity, which attempts to compare the different purchasing power of each country according to the general level of prices. By doing so, it helps to determine the country with the most expensive cost of living. The currency with the higher inflation rate consequently loses value and depreciates, while the currency with the lower inflation rate appreciates in the forex market. Interest rates are also impacted. Inflation rates that are too high push interest rates up, which has the effect of depreciating the currency on the exchange. Conversely, too low inflation (or deflation) pushes interest rates down, which has the effect of appreciating the currency on the foreign exchange market.
Read this term rates in the country, however, allow fiscal and monetary authorities to stimulate the economy.

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